Wednesday, 26 April 2017

Alison Glass Chroma Baby Quilt


I started this baby quilt during an improvisation quilt workshop with Jenny Haynes at the Village Haberdashery back in March. To create the quilt top I used the beautiful Chroma Collection for Andover Fabrics by Alison Glass. I was sent the fabric by a friend Kathy who works for Andover Fabrics in New York, the collection is not yet available to buy until June 2017. Lucky me that got a sneak preview!


I have spent the past month slowly hand-stitching the quilt. I added organic wadding and self bound the quilt using the backing fabric. I forgot to take photos of this process so if you would like to try this method yourself hop over Ludlow Quilt and Sew blog who has a great tutorial about how to do it.

I also used up lots of embroidery thread left-over from my textile students days from the 1990's.
Does anybody remember when Maderia threads produced hand-embroidery floss in these packets? I used them all up (and lots more) on this quilt!


I got a real sense of satisfaction completing this baby quilt and it got me wondering how long it took me to make it.

Session 1: Selecting colour combinations, cutting and machine stitching together = 6 hours
Session 2: Cutting out backing fabric, wadding, pinning together, hand-basting all together = 3 hours
Session 3: Creating / pinning the self-binding, sewing binding and 1/4 hand-quilting = 4
Session 4: Hand-quilting with fine thread = 3 hours
Session 5: Hand-quilting with fine thread = 3 hours
Session 6: Hand-quilting with embroidery thread = 6 hours
Session 7: Hand-quilting with embroidery thread around the border = 3 hours

Approximately 28 hours to produce a predominantly hand-sewn quilt. I have to admit after session six my hand was sore after 6-hours of hand-quilting.

I am hoping all the hard work will be worth it when my friend and her wife receive this gift for their baby girl in June!



I alternated between thinner sewing thread and the thicker embroidery thread to add more textural interest to the quilting. As the fabric was so busy and colourful I chose to sew regular running stitches in straight(ish) lines across the width of the quilt. The thread I selected were picked from a wide range of colours found in the prints. 






You can see the different coloured threads more easily on the reverse of the quilt, although some of the finer sewing threads blend into the background.




I have been inspired to make my own quilt and I am already mid-way through the construction of a double-bed sized quilt. I will reveal more in my next blogpost.

I hope you enjoyed seeing copious amounts of patch-worked and hand-quilted Alison Glass fabrics as much as I had sewing it!

Check out lots of other cool crafty blogs at #handmademonday organised by Julia of Sum of their Stories.


18 comments:

  1. A beautiful quilt Caroline. Quilting doesn't appeal to me, but I can appreciate other peoples work. I really like all the different threads that you have used. I am sure your friends will appreciate their gift!

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    1. Thanks Tamsin x I wasn't that bothered about quilting until I got started making one. It definitely helps having such lovely fabric to work with.

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  2. Wow, you put so much work and effort into it that it is visible! Totally worth it if you ask me, the quilt is stunning. Usually I'm not into quilting but those hand stitched lines just do it for me! Looks so imperfect and as of you've put all your love into it! Beautiful! :)

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    1. Thank you Kat. I really enjoyed making this quilt. I'm pretty happy with my wonky hand-stitching too x

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  3. So good to use up those threads. That is what I use when I hand quilt for no other reason than I have plenty of it! Your finished quilt looks totally brilliant and they will get so many 'pram' compliments. Jo x

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    1. Thanks Jo. Yes - it's great to use those embroidery threads that have been hanging in my stash for far too long.

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  4. Looks great Caroline! I'm sure your friends will love it and appreciate all your hard work. I remember those Maderia packets:)

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    1. Thanks Alex. Yes they don't seem to make embroidery threads in these packets anymore They were great as the embroidery thread didn't tangle up and the packet protected the threads fro getting dirty (especially when you wait 20 years to use theme!).

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  5. A beautiful quilt, Caroline! The hand quilting is so effective. Wish my hand stitching was that even.

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    1. Thanks Pam. I embraced the organic / hand-made feel and I think the stitching probably looks more even at a distance!!

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  6. Only that many hours of stitching?! You're quick!! - BTW, THANK YOU for actually doing HAND-Quilting! Most people seem to forget that the "quilting" part *is* the "stitching" bit! Anyhoo, it looks GORGEOUS! The colour combos are very boho-vintage! That Baby is going to be THE "Coolest" Kid-in-a-Carriage!
    Oh! And, a super use for Embroidery thread! - I've got loads of good quality thrift-shop-finds worth around here... Using it for something besides canvas-work opens up all kinds of ideas!
    :-D

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    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comments Auntie Shan!

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  7. What an heirloom you have created. This is SO beautiful, I'm sure the new parents will treasure this. I love everything about it. Thanks so much for sharing at #HandmadeMonday

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    1. Thank you Julie. I really hope my friends like it!

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    2. Hi Caroline, just to let you know this bea- u- tiful quilt is one of the features this week :-)

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    3. Thanks Julie! I really appreciate it.

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